Must Read Alaska: How to stop paying public employee dues

With the US Supreme Court’s recent decision in Janus v. AFSCME, it is no longer legal to compel public employees to be union members or pay representation fees as a condition of employment.

For those public employees who choose to no longer be members or fee payers, it is not as simple as just stopping the payment or payroll deduction of dues if you are a member, and maybe even if you are a fee payer.

With the US Supreme Court’s recent decision in Janus v. AFSCME, it is no longer legal to compel public employees to be union members or pay representation fees as a condition of employment.

For those public employees who choose to no longer be members or fee payers, it is not as simple as just stopping the payment or payroll deduction of dues if you are a member, and maybe even if you are a fee payer.

Notify your employer’s payroll or human resources/labor relations office that you want to cancel your dues deduction authorization, commonly called a dues check-off form. Give the notice to the employer in writing, copy the union, and keep copies.

Certified, return receipt isn’t a bad idea. Neither unions, nor administrations backed by unions are going to do anything to make this easy for you.

One of my regrets from my time with State labor relations is that I was never able to persuade my principals to come to the aid of employees who had stopped paying union dues in the periods when the State had stopped enforcing the compulsory dues provisions of labor agreements.

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